Rwanda

2011-2015 | Rwanda

Increasing water security through integrated water services combined with a holistic package of health, livelihood, and environmental support programs.

 

 

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Snapshot

Context & Challenges

Relative to many countries in Africa, Rwanda boasts abundant water resources, but water availability varies by location, particularly in the dry Eastern Province. An estimated 31% of Rwandans do not have access to an improved source of drinking water, and 39% lack access to improved sanitation. Rwanda has the highest population density in Africa and one of the highest in the world. Unsustainable farming practices and environmental degradation along with climate change place the agriculture-dominated economy in a precarious position, particularly for the 85% of the population dependent on agricultural livelihoods.

Program

Rwanda Integrated Water Security (RIWSP) Program

Location: Eastern Province, Kayonza and Gatsibo Districts

Dates: 2011-2015

Clients [to date]: 30,000 people receiving access to improved water supply

Funder: USAID through the GLOWS consortium with FIU

Implementers: Winrock International with EGC, DICO, Geotop, World Vision

 

View Photos From Rwanda

 

 

Approach

Improving water security by addressing rural poverty fueled by food insecurity, malnutrition, and high risk of water-related diseases.

Working in collaboration with the communities and government, a holistic approach tackles rural poverty by linking integrated water services with a package of health, livelihood and environmental support programs. A spring-fed piped scheme supplies 36 communities, a regional hospital, two health centers, five schools  and farms with sustainable and reliable water for domestic and productive uses. Following Rwandan law the scheme is owned by the government and operated by a private company, which is jointly selected. Training is provided to the local government, private operator and communities to ensure sustainable service delivery. A holistic approach to nutritional health combining water, sanitation, kitchen gardens and nutrition education helps improve children’s health. Agricultural productivity and climate resiliency are increased through mulching, on-farm water use efficiency, climate-smart crop choices, improved seeds, and improved horticultural techniques. Reforestation curbs soil degradation and improves soil characteristics and in turn, forests provide timber, firewood and other products like honey and fruit. Education on Integrated Water Resources Management (IWRM), climate change adaptation and environmental management enhances sustainability.

 

 

Water

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  • A spring-fed piped scheme supplies 36 communities, a regional hospital, two health centers, five schools and farms with sustainable and reliable water supply for domestic and productive uses managed through a public-private partnership (PPP)
  • Five schools equipped with rainwater harvesting systems
  • Four spring water reservoirs equipped with treadle pumps for productive uses including gardens, nurseries and livestock

 

Health

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  • Greater volumes of water and more reliable services are made available for drinking, cooking and personal hygiene
  • Hygiene behavior change training focused on handwashing helps reduce water-related disease
  • Holistic approach to nutritional health combining water, sanitation, kitchen gardens and nutrition education helps improve children’s health

 

Livelihoods

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  • Increased access to productive-use water services support income generation activities such as gardening, livestock watering and tree planting
  • Agricultural productivity and climate resiliency are increased through mulching, on-farm water use efficiency, climate-smart crop choices, improved seeds and improved horticultural techniques
  • Treadle pumps and smart gardening technologies combined with marketing assistance increase incomes from off-season market gardens and traditional farm crops
  • Kitchen gardens improve food security and nutrition at households and schools

 

Environment

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  • Reforestation curbs soil degradation and improves soil characteristics. In turn, forests provide timber, firewood and other products like honey and fruit
  • Education on Integrated Water Resources Management (IWRM), climate change adaptation and environmental management enhances sustainability
  • MUS is a great way to link peoples local interests to IWRM

 

 

 

What We’ve Learned

 

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