Snapshot

Context & Challenges

Rural Nigerieans face grinding poverty on a daily basis. In 2012, Niger ranked last in the world on the UNDP Human Development Index of 186 countries. Water-related challenges drive poverty in this arid country where the distribution of water resources and rainfall patterns are highly variable and where little storage or distribution infrastructure exists to mitigate climatic conditions, especially in poorer regions. Even in good agricultural production years 25% of the population is considered food insecure, reaching crisis proportions during frequent drought periods. Up to 60% of the rural population has no access to improved water supply, and 94% are without improved sanitation. Water quality is also a major concern due to the high incidence of open defecation, high density of cattle, and shallow water tables in some parts of the country. In the Zinder region, communities depend on unimproved hand-dug wells for all of their water needs. Over 50% of children under five suffer from chronic malnutrition, and more than 20% die before their fifth birthday, in large part due to water-related diseases.

Programs

West Africa Water Initiative (WAWI)

Location: Zinder Region

Dates: 2008-2010

Clients: 17,370 people with improved access to water supply

Funders: USAID and the Coca-Cola Company

Implementers: Winrock International with Crac-GRN, Demi-E, NO-DEF, and Practica Foundation

West Africa Water, Sanitation and Hygiene (WA-WASH)

Location: Zinder Region

Dates: 2010-2014

Beneficiaries: 8,210 people with improved access to water supply

Funders: USAID through the GLOWS consortium with FIU

Implementers: Winrock International with Crac-GRN, Demi-E, NO-DEF, and Practica Foundation

 

View Photos From Zinder Region

 

 

Approach

Increase community resilience and reduce poverty with an integrated approach to water service provision, targeting smaller communities that are a low priority for government support. 

A community-driven participatory planning process identifies priority water needs and available sources. A range of investments in infrastructure and management systems increase the quantity, quality and sustainability of water supply for drinking, food production, and income generation. Infrastructure investments include manually drilled boreholes fitted with locally-fabricated pumps, upgrades to existing traditional wells and garden wells. Locally manufactured, low-cost pumps and water recharge technologies are developed and tested, including the training of small-scale, private entrepreneurs to provide services, technologies and spare parts along the entire water supply value chain. Health-enhancing activities include hygiene behavior change and promotion of low-cost technologies. Livelihoods training in market gardening and low-cost technologies such as tube wells and treadle pumps are provided to convert small family gardens into year-round sources of income, increasing overall agricultural productivity. Community training in the operation and maintenance of water service infrastructure, the promotion of women’s participation and leadership in water point management, and the strengthening of the local private sector supply chain all help ensure sustainability of services.

 

Water

tn_11_Water Icon

  • Focus on smaller communities that are a low priority for government support
  • Infrastructure investments include manually drilled boreholes and upgrading of existing traditional wells
  • Developing and testing locally manufactured, low-cost pumps and water recharge technologies supports sustainability
  • Training is provided to small, private entrepreneurs to provide services, technologies and spare parts along the entire water supply value chain

 

Health

tn_16_Health Icon

  • Greater volumes of water and more reliable services are made available for drinking, cooking, and personal hygiene
  • Hygiene behavior change training focused on handwashing helps reduce water-related disease
  • Low-cost hygiene and sanitation technologies are promoted, including handwashing stations

 

Livelihoods

tn_20_Livelihood Icon

  • Increased access to productive-use water services support income generation activities such as gardening, livestock watering and aquaculture
  • Families receive lowcost tube well and treadle pump technologies to increase agricultural productivity of small gardens and provide a year-round source of income
  • Technical livelihoods training supports enhanced income-generation opportunities
  • Community training in the operation and maintenance of infrastructure helps ensure sustainability of services, including promoting women’s participation and leadership.

 

Environment

tn_24_Environment Icon

 

 

 

What We’ve Learned

 

Solution Stories

A Kabori Story Niger 2010 photo 400x300

A Kabori Story – A Family Upgrades Their Multiple-Use Water Services

A Nigerien family struggles with limited water access until a combination of technologies helps them meet all of their water needs.

Cluster repairmen attend in-depth rope pump repair course photo 400x300

Cluster Repairmen Attend In-depth Rope Pump Repair Course

Technical training ensures sustainability of community water points.

Hand Washing Stations Convenient and Healthy Niger 2010 photo 400x300

Handwashing Stations: Convenient and Healthy

Is an investment of 71 cents just as important as $2,000 dollars? This family thinks so.

Videos

A Kabori Story: Multiple-Use Water Services in Action

Jump to: Burkina FasoGhanaIndiaNepalRwandaTanzania